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Friday, February 16
 

11:45am PST

Check-in, Registration, and Refreshments
Friday February 16, 2018 11:45am - 12:15pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union

12:15pm PST

Welcome and Overview
Speakers
DW

Dane Ward

Dean, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 12:15pm - 12:30pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union

12:30pm PST

T4T Talk - Touchpoint with Tech - Engaging The Large Class
When some of us started teaching at Appstate our students’  ratio to faculty was something like 30 to 1.  As the University has increased its productivity class sizes have grown substantially, sometimes with ratios of 250 to 1.  Personal interactions with professors in these classes suffers from this ratio as does learning opportunities beyond the lecture/exam cycle.  Technology offers the ability to increase “touchpoints” where students can interact with the material and professor at higher rates.  This keynote will discuss what technology is becoming commonplace and what needed technology is emerging for large classes. 

Speakers
avatar for Timothy D. Ludwig, Ph.D.

Timothy D. Ludwig, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Psychology, Appalachian State University
Dr. Ludwig is a 24-year Professor at Appalachian State University where he teaches in Department of Psychology and in the nationally recognized Industrial/Organizational Psychology and Human Resources Management Masters program (IOHRM). Dr. Ludwig's teaching has been recognized with... Read More →


Friday February 16, 2018 12:30pm - 1:05pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union

1:10pm PST

#1 - Accessibility Demystified
Technology: Let us help you to be proactive by learning how to make your online course content more accessible. We can answer your questions about accessibility and point you toward online and in-person resources. How do I make a PDF accessible? How do I test a website for accessibility? What are best practices in ASULearn? Who provides accessibility support at ASU? Bring your questions and learn new ways to improve accessibility!
Evidence: Accessibility is an important topic to address for our campus. Our Accessibility Working team (comprised of faculty and staff from the Library, Office of Disability Services, Center for Academic Excellence and University College) has been collaborating on a project to make it easier for faculty, staff, and students to address accessibility needs on our campus.
Broader Impacts: Accessibility touches on everything from physical spaces to virtual ones. It isn't hard to reason that accessibility is for everyone. It also isn't as difficult as it may seem. Join us for a great conversation.

Speakers
JB

Josh Bailey

IT Accessibility Consultant, Appalachian State University
JC

Jeff Church

Instructional Technology Consultant, Appalachian State University
avatar for Jennifer Natale

Jennifer Natale

Information Literacy Librarian, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 1:10pm - 1:35pm PST
E-Poster Session 1 Plemmons Student Union

1:10pm PST

#10 - Video Engagement with Panopto Quizzes
Technology: More and more online, hybrid, and F2F courses are using "video lectures" and deploying media that are expected to be passively consumed by students. As a result, a recent hot topic of research and discussion has been the exploration of ways to actually engage students during the viewing of these resources so that 1) Their retention of the material goes up, and 2) They are more likely to stay engaged and watch the entire presentation. This presentation will include examples of using Panopto's built-in "Quizzes" feature to offer short assessments/reinforcing questions during the video -- which hopefully will keep the students more engaged, and also increase their retention through questions focused on the video's main instructional objectives.
Evidence: This is a new project on our campus, but the literature, based largely on research targeted on video resources offered in various MOOCs, points clearly to 1) The need for strategies to keep students engaged, and 2) That content creators carefully consider the length of video resources as they relate to engagement.
Broader Impacts: The goal of any course is for the student to master the material. If "video lectures" or other media deliver that course material, and it fails to engage students, it follows that learning on the part of the student is not enhanced.

Speakers
AT

Antonio T. Bly

Associate Professor, Appalachian State University
avatar for Greg Simmons

Greg Simmons

Instructional Technology Consultant, Appalachian State University
Instructional Technology Consultant. Lead Consultant for College of Business and School of Music. Specialties include: AsULearn development and administration; Online Course Development/Quality Matters; Publishers & Content Integration with the LMS; Turnitin; Zoom; Web Conferencing... Read More →


Friday February 16, 2018 1:10pm - 1:35pm PST
E-Poster Session 1 Plemmons Student Union

1:10pm PST

#2 - Aportfolio
Technology: Aportfolio is AppState's ePortfolio system. ePortfolio provide students with the creative space to reflect, collect and showcase their learning.
Evidence: Our Aportfolio scholars exemplify integrative learning and excellence in academics. Since its inception in 2014 over 8000 student ePortfolios have been initiated.
Broader Impacts: Since 2014 over 1245 course have used Aportfolio and over 1647 Aportfolio assignments have been created. Programs across campus are using Aportfolio to assess and showcase students learning.

Speakers
avatar for Elaine Gray

Elaine Gray

Director, Appalachian State University
Eportfolio for pedagogy, integration, meaning making, student showcase, and programmatic assessment


Friday February 16, 2018 1:10pm - 1:35pm PST
E-Poster Session 1 Plemmons Student Union

1:10pm PST

#3 - Break Out of the Norm!
Technology: Break Out of the Norm utilizes technology to enhance student engagement and learning through the use of "breakout boxes." A spin off of the "escape room" idea, breakout boxes use a series or collection of clues to lead students to learn about a topic while simultaneously uncovering clues to unlock a box (a tool box with multi-hasp and varying locks). I used QR codes, videos, websites, Google Forms, and a Google Sheets add-on called "Wizy Merge" to facilitate the breakout box experience for my students. Additionally, I used tool boxes, multi-hasps, and keyed/combination locks to systematically organize the adventure. The goal is always the topic or learning objectives for the unit or course; however, using breakout boxes increases curiosity, critical thinking, and engagement in the learning process by adding mystery and problem-solving to the experience.  
Evidence: I used breakout boxes with my CI 2300 students this semester. On the last day of class I asked them to create an infographic that shares their favorite memory from our semester. The majority of the students indicated that their favorite memory was the breakout box activity that happened in September. Considering they remembered it in December, that is a feat in and of itself! They noted that they were engaged and intrigued by the experience and many want to use it in their future classes. 
Broader Impacts: What is nice about breakout boxes is that they can be adapted for any content. They can be created to facilitate a staff meeting or to help student learn more about a topic. My breakout box for CI 2300 was focused on teaching them about fake news; however, in the process, they also learned a little chemistry (compound naming rules). Breakout boxes are a student-centered, hands-on, inquiry-based instructional strategy that can be useful to teachers at all levels (PK-12 and higher ed).

Speakers
avatar for Morgan Blanton

Morgan Blanton

Clinical Assistant Professor, Appalachian State University



Friday February 16, 2018 1:10pm - 1:35pm PST
E-Poster Session 1 Plemmons Student Union

1:10pm PST

#4 - Doc Appender in Google Forms
Technology: Using DocAppender in Google forms allows me to establish a grading/feedback rubric with my students and "append" the responses of multiple students to a set of Google docs where students can receive feedback from their fellow students and professor. This allows students to gain experience in both giving and receiving feedback in an anonymous setting. Students can be evaluated on both their project and the quality of feedback they provide to others. Students receiving feedback benefit from the varied perspectives of feedback from many sources.
Evidence: I have used Docappender in my graduate course and found that it improved the quality of work done by student compared to prior semesters. Knowing they would be evaluated by their peers appeared to make students more thoughtful and put in greater effort than when I did not do peer evaluations. Several research papers (citations available if requested) discuss the educational benefits of both giving and receiving peer evaluations. By developing the grading rubric together, students also utilize critical thinking skills in what makes an effective presentation, project or assignment.
Broader Impacts: In public accounting, individuals will both give and receive feedback throughout their careers. Gaining skills in both aspects of the feedback process is critical for future accountants. As a tool, peer assessment facilitates learning and enhances critical thinking skills.
Presentation Category:

Speakers
avatar for Tracy Reed

Tracy Reed

Associate Professor, Appalachian State University
Link to Powerpoint: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1_w5YWtoiRnRsFuOMWgaXc0OZFqkTULwAsK_xzQKusQ8/edit?usp=sharing Link to Example 1: https://goo.gl/forms/qG8WS2RPOsN8qLUx1 Link for Example 2: https://goo.gl/forms/hSlNbjgarcjLIX832 Link for Example 3: https://goo.gl/forms/ij7REsACZrZqfL9p2 Link... Read More →


Friday February 16, 2018 1:10pm - 1:35pm PST
E-Poster Session 1 Plemmons Student Union

1:10pm PST

#5 - Engagement Strategies with Flipgrid
Technology: In this session, I will share my experiences using the video response tool, Flipgrid, in both online and blended teaching and learning contexts across graduate and undergraduate courses. The focus of my presentation will be on how to enhance student engagement and active learning through the use of this innovative video tool. Specifically, I will extend theories in social-constructivism as the guiding philosophy of my use of this technology. As part of my presentation, I hope to inspire brainstorming of other ways the tool can be used to create engagement across content, students, and in the world.
Evidence: I have been using Flipgrid in my classes since January 2017. Sharing my grids with colleagues in the College of Education ignited interest in exploring this tool. To support emerging curiosity, our department purchased the 10-licensue package. Since this point, Tom Van Gilder and others in Learning Technology Services in the Center for Academic Excellence have expressed an interest in supporting a larger campus initiative. Further, in my classes, students have commented on how the tool helps them build community and share ideas. While largely anecdotal at this point, this evidence illustrates the impact of this tool on learning communities.
Broader Impacts: It is my hope that my session will inspire discussion of the broader impacts of how Flipgrid can be used to facilitate students’ engagement and learning in authentic ways. Specifically, I hope to develop a list of considerations that may be used to promote active learning and higher order thinking, rather than lower-order memory and recall types of engagement. In this way, my presentation will focus on thinking through pedagogy and implications for learning experiences as vital prerequisites for using Flipgrid.

Speakers
avatar for Theresa Redmond

Theresa Redmond

Associate Professor, Appalachian State University
Theresa is an Associate Professor at Appalachian State University where she teaches in Media Studies and Teacher Education. Her research investigates how digital media and communication technologies impact literacy, fluency, teaching, learning, expression, and engagement. Currently... Read More →


Friday February 16, 2018 1:10pm - 1:35pm PST
E-Poster Session 1 Plemmons Student Union

1:10pm PST

#6 - Learning from nature with IoT (Internet of Things)
Technology: IoT or Internet-of-Things for data collection and interaction within nature by students and faculty engaged in field research. 
Evidence: IoT, or Internet-of-Things, technologies popularized by home and industrial automation are also used to gather data and interact in the natural world. See how IoT enables researchers (including student and faculty) to gather data and interact in nature. From Ants, Bees, and Cows to Zucchini, IoT is used to collect data from sensors including sunlight, temperature, rainfall, monitor activity, and even control switches that deliver water, food, open gates, and otherwise affect the surroundings. 
Broader Impacts: Tapping into COTS (Commodity Off the Shelf) IoT (Internet-of-Things) devices mass produced for home and industrial automation enables educators access at lower costs than specialized equipment. Such technologies including the Arduino, Raspberry pi, and similar microcontrollers can collect data from a variety of sensors then transmit data via the internet or public airways using BlueTooth, WiFi, and even Amateur Radio frequencies. Cloud based sensor/data fusion, aggregation, analysis, and visualization enable research that can lead to practical decision making for future scientists, farmers, and even policy makers.   

Speakers
avatar for Derek Eggers, Ed.D.

Derek Eggers, Ed.D.

Faculty Instructional Technology Consultant, Appalachian State University
Active LearningMaker Movement / MakerspaceInstructional Design / Development


Friday February 16, 2018 1:10pm - 1:35pm PST
E-Poster Session 1 Plemmons Student Union

1:10pm PST

#7 - Quizizz: A Web-based Multi-player Activity for Course Review
Technology: Quizizz is a free web-based program that can be used for interactive review of course content or assessment of learning. It incorporates elements of gamification including avatars, memes, and leader boards. It can be used live in class or set-up as an out of class homework assignment. Each participant works through questions at their own pace on a computer or hand held device. The Quizizz developer can create custom memes to reinforce course content or use stock ones that add humor and entertainment to the material review. Questions can be manually entered or imported from and Excel template.
Evidence: Anecdotally, some students prefer the self-pacing of Quizizz to some other quiz review programs, such as Kahoot that require everyone to move thru the questions at the same pace. The use of memes to provide feedback for correct incorrect questions serves as immediate positive reinforcement and injects humor into the classroom. Studies and experts suggest that humor and gamification helps improve learning outcomes while engaging students and relieving stress (Ziv 2014, Lei et al. 2010, Terrell 2014, Renaud and Wagoner 2011).
Broader Impacts: These type of review “games” have the ability to be implemented across disciplines and participant results can be useful to the instructor to evaluate both teaching success and the quality of the questions presented.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Howard

Jennifer Howard

Assistant Professor, Appalachian State University
Health & Exercise Science, Athletic Training



Friday February 16, 2018 1:10pm - 1:35pm PST
E-Poster Session 1 Plemmons Student Union

1:10pm PST

#8 - REDCap for Research
Technology: REDCap™ (Research Electronic Data Capture) is a free and HIPPA-secure web-based application for building and managing online surveys and databases. The user-friendly application allows researchers to build fully customizable project templates used for real-time data entry. It includes advanced question options (ie., branching logic, mid-study modifications, calculated fields) and a project calendar feature. Multiple export options for common statistical analysis packages are also available.
Evidence: A graduate assistant developed an online database in REDCap to mirror surveys administered in a cohort study conducted with speech-language pathology students who completed standardized surveys to assess vocal hygiene (Vocal Hygiene Patient Questionnaire) and to quantify the impact of voice on psychosocial domains of functioning (Voice Handicap Index). The aim of this pre-post study was to investigate the impact of utilizing a therapeutic voice journal on increased awareness of phonotraumatic behaviors in voice use. REDCap was used to clean, organize, and review the primary data collected.
Broader Impacts: Researchers could benefit from a secure, customizable data management platform. While REDCap was initially created to support clinical research studies, it can also be used in basic science. REDCap is utilized by multiple academic institutions, and is now accessible to faculty, students, and staff at Appalachian State University.

Speakers
JH

Jordan Hazelwood

Assistant Professor, Appalachian State University
HM

Heather Miller

Graduate Student, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 1:10pm - 1:35pm PST
E-Poster Session 1 Plemmons Student Union

1:10pm PST

#9 - Using New Technologies in Non-STEM Disciplines
Technology: Many professors in non-STEM disciplines are interested in new and emerging technologies but don't think that they can incorporate it into their classes. This e-poster will discuss two emerging technologies (3D scanning and game development) and the contexts in which they can be used in the creation of course projects. By offering projects that utilize technology, students can both learn new transferable skills as well as experience an engaging alternative to the traditional course paper.
Evidence: After working with classes on non-conventional projects that used technology, the student work that was produced showed ingenuity and engagement. When offered the opportunity to explore as part of their class, students were more willing to put in time to create with these new technologies. Final projects showed everything from online environments to games that illustrated concepts from the class. In addition, the idea of utilizing technology to "make" things as a sign of student success is well documented in makerspace literature, as well as in literature about Digital Humanities.
Broader Impacts: The nature of this e-poster is to encourage faculty from non-STEM disciplines to become more involved with technology in class projects. By incorporating new technologies, students are given the ability to broaden their knowledge base and gain skills that will help them upon graduation.

Link to presentation: 

Using New Technologies in Non-STEM Disciplines​​​

Speakers
avatar for Hannah Pope

Hannah Pope

Faculty, Appalachian State University
Hannah Pope is the Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Appalachian State University Libraries where she has created and run the makerspace program since its inception. She received her Masters in Library Science from UNC Chapel Hill.


Friday February 16, 2018 1:10pm - 1:35pm PST
E-Poster Session 1 Plemmons Student Union

1:40pm PST

Digital Literacy across the Appalachian State University Curriculum with Adobe Creative Cloud
This presentation explores the possibilities for digitial literacy in potentially every class, every major, and every discipline across the curriculum. Professor Todd Taylor will describe how the interdisciplinary writing program that he directs at UNC-Chapel Hill serves as a threshold digital literacy experience for first-year students as they enter the university. The presentation shares examples of critical, analytic student work in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Professor Taylor will demonstrate how the “learning curve” can be flattened with a new generation of powerful digital literacy tools, such as Adobe Creative Cloud, so that instructors and students alike can spend more time on teaching and learning their courses and less time on the software. The presentation showcases free, online support materials, including the new e-textbook Adobe Creative Cloud Across the Curriculum: A Guide for Students and Teachers as well as assignment modules and sample student work in Adobe Education Exchange.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Hammond

Jonathan Hammond

Jonathan Hammond, AVP-­‐ Education, State & Local Government, North America Jonathan Hammond is the Vice President for Adobe’s Education, State & Local Business, North America. Jonathan joined Adobe in 2003 and has held leadership positions in both Adobe’s education business... Read More →
avatar for Suzanne Jennings

Suzanne Jennings

Adobe
Suzanne Jennings, Strategic Accounts Manager, Adobe Education Suzanne Jennings is a Strategic Accounts Manager for Adobe’s Education Business. Suzanne joined Adobe in 2015 and manages the top Higher Education accounts in the Carolinas and the mid-Atlantic. Her responsibilities... Read More →
avatar for Todd Taylor

Todd Taylor

Eliason Distinguished Professor, UNC-Chapel Hill
Todd Taylor is the Eliason Distinguished Professor of English at UNC Chapel Hill, where he directs the first-year writing program. Taylor’s research and teaching work to understand how literacy is evolving in response to emerging digital, networked, information, and media technologies... Read More →


Friday February 16, 2018 1:40pm - 2:30pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union

1:40pm PST

Learning Spaces: Where We Are and Where We Want To Be - A conversation with faculty, staff, and students
This spring semester we would like to have some campus conversations on learning spaces at Appalachian State University - where we are, and where we would like to be.  The format of this event will be a short presentation on how the classroom technology at Appalachian has evolved over the past 10 years, and what has been accomplished.  Then, we want to have some open discussion about what’s working, and what faculty, staff and students would like to see improved on for the future.  Please join us for these conversations!

Speakers
avatar for Tom Van Gilder

Tom Van Gilder

IT Director, Appalachian State University
Tom is Director of Learning Technology Services for the Center for Academic Excellence (which encompasses the Learning Management System group) for the past 18 months.. He was Director of IT Support Services for Appalachian State University for the past 10 years and IT Manager for... Read More →
GP

Garry Powell

Classroom Technology Support, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 1:40pm - 2:30pm PST
Beacon Heights Plemmons Student Union

1:40pm PST

Library Technology Discussion Forum
Join us for a short presentation on the Library's current technology offerings for students and faculty and then provide feedback on future directions Library technology may take, such as a data visualization space.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Rice

Scott Rice

Coordinator, Technology Services, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 1:40pm - 2:30pm PST
Rough Ridge Plemmons Student Union

2:35pm PST

#1 - Don't Put That Away: Actively Using Cell Phones, I-Pads, and Computers in the Classroom
Technology: This presentation will address ways in which the cell phone, I-Pad, or laptop can become a tool for classroom learning rather than a distraction. Students in my courses use their cell phones or other portable technology (i.e. I-Pads, laptops) during class to actively look up information, to complete Google Form surveys or partner activities, to take and upload pictures to use in class discussion, and to engage in quick assessments of learning and review of presentation content using Kahoot!.
Evidence: Students get excited when given instructions to login to a Kahoot! They quickly complete internet searches when directed to do so and share the results of their search with the class, increasing their classmates' learning. Students willingly engage in classroom activities involving the use of their own technology and pay close attention during related class discussion.
Broader Impacts: Actively using cell phones and computers in the classroom teaches students how to use their everyday technology to increase learning which hopefully will extend outside of the classroom as well. Direct connections are made between course topics and how/why we are using technology in a particular way.

Speakers
RC

Rebekah Cummings

Lecturer, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 2:35pm - 3:00pm PST
E-Poster Session 2 Plemmons Student Union

2:35pm PST

#10 - VoiceThread: Online Presentations & More
Technology: No class time for students to present projects? Students can use VoiceThread to create online presentations which other students can watch, type comments into, and peer-review from anywhere. Teachers can assess around their schedules and free-up valuable class time. Additionally, a new pilot of an AsULearn integrated version might bring other possibilities, such as creating more interactive discussion forums. During this presentation I’ll discuss ways in which I have implemented this tool in my courses, things I have learned, modifications resulting from those past mistakes, and ideas I have to promote student learning and engagement using VoiceThread in the future.
Evidence: A presentation component in a large class, especially if each presentation is 5-10 minutes long, requires teachers to commit several class periods to presentations alone. Instead, students can hear new perspectives at their convenience. Also, with a rubric for peer review students gain practice evaluating others, promoting metacognition.
Broader Impacts: In general, students feel less anxious presenting online instead of speaking in front of a group as they can re-record any part of their project multiple times. The variety of choices, such as voice-overs, videos and text, for creating and commenting, plus, the annotating capabilities, promote UDL practices.

Link to presentation:

VoiceThread: Online Presentations & More​​​

Student Presentation Example​​​


Speakers
avatar for Alana Baird

Alana Baird

Lecturer, Appalachian State University
I teach a general education quantitative literacy course for non-STEM majors, so I work mainly with freshman and students who often dislike math. I am interested in mathematical modeling, real world applications of mathematics, utilizing technology to assist in problem solving, sustainability... Read More →
RM

Rose Muniz

Student, Appalachian State University



Friday February 16, 2018 2:35pm - 3:00pm PST
E-Poster Session 2 Plemmons Student Union

2:35pm PST

#2 - Improving visualization: Life Beyond GIFs
Technology: We are using structure-from-motion photogrammetry to create models of real-life structures and objects. By digitizing these items, we can easily disseminate the data allowing for remote measurements and observations as well as preserve original geometry prior to subjecting object to destructive tests. We can also compare models of targets over time to detect change from year to year. 
Evidence: Students of mine have been learning this technique and have gone on to use it in research work and class projects. In the last year alone, this technique has produced 6 student-authored posters at conference events and has contributed to several papers that are in submission. 
Broader Impacts: This technique is applicable to many areas of study beyond geology. We have collaborated with anthropologists, archaeologists, and paleontologists on projects so far. I see applications in art, engineering, even chemistry and physics. Computer modeling is the way of the future and this technique allows us to put real-world items into those computer models.

Speakers
AC

Alexandra Christofalos

Student, Appalachian State University
avatar for Brian Zimmer

Brian Zimmer

Senior Lecturer, Appalachian State University
Geology


Friday February 16, 2018 2:35pm - 3:00pm PST
E-Poster Session 2 Plemmons Student Union

2:35pm PST

#3 - Instrumental Laboratory Experience for Assessment of Voice
Technology: Graduate speech-language pathology students participated in hands-on instrumental laboratory experiences in the Appalachian State University Voice & Swallowing Center. Following foundational didactic lectures reviewing voice assessment procedures, students utilized laboratory instruments to practice gathering clinically relevant assessment measures (e.g., laryngeal function, vocal fold parameters, pitch, loudness, nasalance, and air flow). This experience supplemented the students’ understanding as they learned to interpret measures frequently collected during clinical assessment of voice disorders. Participation in the laboratory experiences enhanced students’ understanding of clinical procedures, while also satisfying program accreditation standards which require student competence of voice assessment and instrumentation for diagnosis and treatment.
Evidence: Following participation in the instrumental laboratory experience, students shared about the quality of their understanding. The majority of the students reported that this particular portion of the course was helpful in increasing their understanding of curriculum, that the lab contributed to their understanding of how instrumentation is used in diagnosis and treatment, that as a result of the lab, they are better prepared to use instrumentation in their clinical and professional practice, and that the lab should be offered to future students. General themes regarding improvements and particular components of the lab students reported liking will be presented.
Broader Impacts: Integrating classroom lecture with clinically relevant instrumental laboratory experiences will enhance students’ comprehensive understanding of voice assessment. When used in combination with traditional didactic teaching methods, instrumental technology allows students to apply foundational knowledge and better prepare them for future clinical practice.

Speakers
LA

Lindsay Austin

Graduate Student, Appalachian State University
JH

Jordan Hazelwood

Assistant Professor, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 2:35pm - 3:00pm PST
E-Poster Session 2 Plemmons Student Union

2:35pm PST

#4 - Integrating High School Physics Laboratory Activities in Rural Schools Using MyTech
Technology: High school students in affluent, inner city, or rural communities should have access to a physics laboratory experience. Students can work together in pairs or as a whole class to gather data. This presentation introduces an application MyTech, developed by the NC State Physics Education Research group and the NC State Distance Education and Learning Technology Applications group (DELTA). MyTech is an interactive app that can perform many physics experiments and record data for future analysis. Such experiments include kinematics, acceleration due to gravity, simple harmonic motion, and collisions.
Evidence: At a North Carolina Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers (NCS-AAPT) meeting, our faculty mentor participated in a MyTech workshop. As of now, MyTech is applied in the PHY3400 Practicum course, where students develop and present a mini-lesson using the app. Currently at Appalachian, we have no statistical data or course reviews regarding the app. However, students in Practicum have further developed their mini-lessons, implementing a full lesson during their clinical internship.
Broader Impacts: There is a notion that physics apparatus are expensive and take up a space. However, demonstrations and experiments can be performed on a shoestring budget. MyTech is free and can be used in the physics curriculum, especially mechanics, to collect data in real time. It is one and done!

Speakers
CP

Caroline Piephoff

Student, Appalachian State University
avatar for Ellie Prim

Ellie Prim

Student, Appalachian State University
Physics Secondary Education Major Using a software to simulate the total solar eclipse taking place on August 21, 2017.
avatar for David Sitar

David Sitar

Director of Rankin GoTo Laboratories, Appalachian State University
Physics & AstronomyThe total solar eclipse happening on August 21st and software that can be used to find best location of totality.


Friday February 16, 2018 2:35pm - 3:00pm PST
E-Poster Session 2 Plemmons Student Union

2:35pm PST

#5 - Sociology In Everyday Life: Learning by Doing
Technology: I have students complete class assignments by creating a unique and individualized blog. The use of computer/web technology allows students to use a technology that they may be familiar with and complete work in a more personalized and creative way than simply typing up a paper. Additionally, the blog format allows students to share their work with others thus knowing that others will be reading can motivate students to care more about the final product. Moreover, the blog format allows students to incorporate pictures, videos, etc. to illustrate their understanding more so than the traditional term paper.
Evidence: Some students have said they are visual learners and like the option when given to create or include a picture or diagram that would not normally be able to be included in a term paper. Some students have said that the weekly assignments helped them really see and understand the material than just learning it in class and forgetting about it. Also, test scores on the whole were higher than past semesters where I have not included this technology.
Broader Impacts: It can provide a new skill to those who may need to know how to in the future. Additionally, the student will have a work at the end of class that they may be able to use for another class-I think of graphic design and or journalism.

Speakers
JY

Jerrod Yarosh

Lecturer, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 2:35pm - 3:00pm PST
E-Poster Session 2 Plemmons Student Union

2:35pm PST

#6 - The New Moment for Open Educational Resources
Technology: The idea of open educational resources seemed once a not-so-feasible pipedream for educators. However, a new day has arrived: a number of universities are pioneering new ways to deliver student resources with free or low-cost collections of high quality, well-curated free online textbooks that offer them a chance in the fight against gauging by proprietary textbook publishers. Open educational resources are typically textbooks and other curriculum resources available for free on the web for students in various formats (sometimes cloud-based, sometimes downloadable), saving them hundreds of dollars in a day when a college education can ill be afforded.
Evidence: In a 2016 study, the cost of textbooks meant that 66% of students had not purchased a required course textbook; 45% did not register for a specific course; 37% had earned a poor grade; 26% had dropped a course; and 19% had failed a course. These numbers had all risen significantly from similar indexes for the 2012 school year. In a pilot study at AppState this fall, strong support was found among students for open educational resources. More importantly, students responded well to being given a voice in the textbooks chosen for their courses.
Broader Impacts: As more organized and polished approaches to open educational resources expand, and as instructors are willing to try them, education becomes more sustainable for students, reducing their debt and improving their chances of post-college success serving society, rather than serving overwhelming student loans due in part to overpriced textbooks.
Technology: The idea of open educational resources seemed once a not-so-feasible pipedream for educators. However, a new day has arrived: a number of universities are pioneering new ways to deliver student resources with free or low-cost collections of high quality, well-curated free online textbooks that offer them a chance in the fight against gauging by proprietary textbook publishers. Open educational resources are typically textbooks and other curriculum resources available for free on the web for students in various formats (sometimes cloud-based, sometimes downloadable), saving them hundreds of dollars in a day when a college education can ill be afforded.
Evidence: In a 2016 study, the cost of textbooks meant that 66% of students had not purchased a required course textbook; 45% did not register for a specific course; 37% had earned a poor grade; 26% had dropped a course; and 19% had failed a course. These numbers had all risen significantly from similar indexes for the 2012 school year. In a pilot study at AppState this fall, strong support was found among students for open educational resources. More importantly, students responded well to being given a voice in the textbooks chosen for their courses.
Broader Impacts: As more organized and polished approaches to open educational resources expand, and as instructors are willing to try them, education becomes more sustainable for students, reducing their debt and improving their chances of post-college success serving society, rather than serving overwhelming student loans due in part to overpriced textbooks.

Link to presentation:

The New Moment for Open Educational Resources​​​

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Clark

Rachel Clark

Instructional Technology Consultant, Appalachian State University
Rachel Clark is an Instructional Technology Consultant in the Center for Academic Excellence at Appalachian State University. She trains Appalachian’s faculty and staff in technologies that support learning and teaching and consults in best teaching practices. Prior to her current... Read More →
avatar for Hannah Pope

Hannah Pope

Faculty, Appalachian State University
Hannah Pope is the Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Appalachian State University Libraries where she has created and run the makerspace program since its inception. She received her Masters in Library Science from UNC Chapel Hill.


Friday February 16, 2018 2:35pm - 3:00pm PST
E-Poster Session 2 Plemmons Student Union

2:35pm PST

#8 - Tired of Grading Excel Assignments?
Technology: Excel assignments can build skills that are valued by employers. However, grading such assignments can be an arduous task. I have developed an automated grading program that can grade student work quickly, facilitating faster feedback to students and the assignment of more Excel work for students.
Evidence: I have used the automated grading program for several semesters. A number of colleagues have used it as well. Without it, I would have been forced to eliminate some spreadsheeet assignments. The grading program has also allowed me to provide students the chance to correct and resubmit their work, thereby learning from their own mistakes.
Broader Impacts: Excel assignments can also promote learning of underlying course material, such as accounting, finance, and statistics.

Speakers
CM

Chris McNeil

Professor, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 2:35pm - 3:00pm PST
E-Poster Session 2 Plemmons Student Union

2:35pm PST

#9 - Using “Publish to the Web” to Share Individual Tabs in Google Sheets
Technology: Sheets within Google Apps is a powerful and useful program that is commonly used. However, sometimes it is ideal to have multiple ‘tabs’ within a Google Sheet file. For example, when compiling records for multiple students within a single file each student might have their own tab. Unfortunately, the typical Google Share function does not allow for the sharing of a single tab, and makes it impossible to share information with individual students without giving them access to other students’ information. Likewise, creating individual files for each student with individual sharing settings can be cumbersome and time consuming.
Evidence: A simple solution to this is the “Publish to the Web” function which can be used to create a unique web-page for each tab within the Sheet File. The link to this page can be restricted to App State Users and can be set to continually update as the Sheet is updated. The link can then be shared with the individual student to provide them with accurate, up-to-date information, without violating the privacy of other students.
Broader Impacts: This function can be useful for activities such as student advising, when it may be convenient to keep all students in a cohort in a single sheet with separate tabs for each student, but necessary to provide students with individual access to their own plans of study. The created links can then be distributed to students using Add-On Mail Merge Applications.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Howard

Jennifer Howard

Assistant Professor, Appalachian State University
Health & Exercise Science, Athletic Training


Friday February 16, 2018 2:35pm - 3:00pm PST
E-Poster Session 2 Plemmons Student Union

3:05pm PST

Active Learning Classrooms
Active Learning Classrooms -- or ALC’s sometimes referred to as TEAL (Teaching for Active Learning) Classrooms are differentiated by traditional lecture style classrooms by the layout of the room and support technology designed to promote Active Learning pedagogy.    Participants in this round-table discussion will share ideas, experiences, and strategies for maximizing the effectiveness of ALCs at AppState.

Speakers
avatar for Derek Eggers, Ed.D.

Derek Eggers, Ed.D.

Faculty Instructional Technology Consultant, Appalachian State University
Active LearningMaker Movement / MakerspaceInstructional Design / Development
avatar for Tom Van Gilder

Tom Van Gilder

IT Director, Appalachian State University
Tom is Director of Learning Technology Services for the Center for Academic Excellence (which encompasses the Learning Management System group) for the past 18 months.. He was Director of IT Support Services for Appalachian State University for the past 10 years and IT Manager for... Read More →


Friday February 16, 2018 3:05pm - 3:45pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union

3:05pm PST

Emerging Technologies
Join a discussion about new technologies, such as virtual and augmented reality devices, and the ways they can be used to enhance teaching.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Rice

Scott Rice

Coordinator, Technology Services, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 3:05pm - 3:45pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union

3:05pm PST

Google
Google.... Going Beyond Gmail to include Calendar, Drive, Sites, and more.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Grant

Tony Grant

Technology Support Specialist, Appalachian State University
Desktop Support Specialist for the Central Campus sector. Specialize in Microsoft Windows, Apple Macintosh, iOS, Android and other desktop and mobile computing environments. Troubleshooting, training and identification of computing needs.


Friday February 16, 2018 3:05pm - 3:45pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union

3:05pm PST

Interaction & Collaboration
Learn about the latest research in utilizing social media as a pedagogical tool. Discussion will focus on effective social platforms and tech tools for collaborating and interacting with students and colleagues in face-to-face, hybrid, and online courses

Speakers
avatar for Judson MacDonald

Judson MacDonald

Spanish Instructor/Graduate Student, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 3:05pm - 3:45pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union

3:05pm PST

Makerspace Technologies
Join a discussion about the ways makerspace technologies, such as 3D printing and robotics, can be used to enhance instruction in a variety of disciplines

Speakers
avatar for Hannah Pope

Hannah Pope

Faculty, Appalachian State University
Hannah Pope is the Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Appalachian State University Libraries where she has created and run the makerspace program since its inception. She received her Masters in Library Science from UNC Chapel Hill.


Friday February 16, 2018 3:05pm - 3:45pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union

3:05pm PST

Online Course Development
Are you new to online teaching and learning?  Or, maybe you are a seasoned vet when it comes to online.  This roundtable discussion will be a lively discussion of how to get started with online course development and suggestions for some good practices when it comes to teaching effectively online.  

Speakers
MB

Mary Beth McKee

Lead Instructional Designer, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 3:05pm - 3:45pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union

3:05pm PST

Peer Evals/Assessment
Are you interested in sharing ideas about how to more effectively and efficiently assess student learning? If so, join us at this roundtable discussion as we strategize together how we can better use tools to support our assessment work.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Colby

Susan Colby

Director of Faculty Professional Development, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 3:05pm - 3:45pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union

3:05pm PST

Student Engagement
There are several new web-based technologies faculty are utilizing in the classroom to help with student engagement.  This will be a conversation about some of the technologies that people have tried with success, as well as a discussion of some of the pitfalls for some of these technologies.  This might be just one of many future conversations about technologies that facilitate student engagement.

Speakers
JC

Jeff Church

Instructional Technology Consultant, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 3:05pm - 3:45pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union

3:50pm PST

#1 - Collaborative Network Services Immersive Environments
Technology: Immerses faculty and students into an interactive experience with guest lectures and peers both nationally and internationally.
Evidence: Archive files (videos).
Broader Impacts: Example: Global Understandings First Year Seminar students were able to not only talk about life at Appalachian, but physically walk through areas of campus (using iPad Pro) and show international counterparts what life is like and also have Q&A

Speakers
DL

Darrell Laws

Manager for Collaborative Network Services, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 3:50pm - 4:15pm PST
E-Poster Session 3 Plemmons Student Union

3:50pm PST

#2 - Google Drive(ing) You Crazy? We can help...
Technology: The benefits of utilizing Google Apps for collaboration are numerous for student engagement and learning, but sometimes it can be quite a chore to figure out the best ways to get started, or even find anything! We will talk about some strategies for effective use of Google Drive and Google Team Drive in the academic environment, and hopefully make it easier for people to utilize these tools.
Evidence: A recent campus ECAR survey showed that 73% of students wish instructors used Online collaboration tools in the classroom. Yet, more than 50% of the students responding to the survey stated that instructors did not encourage students to use online collaboration tools to communicate/collaborate.

Broader Impacts: GSuite apps has a plethora of ways to increase in-class interactions and collaborations for students and faculty.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Van Gilder

Tom Van Gilder

IT Director, Appalachian State University
Tom is Director of Learning Technology Services for the Center for Academic Excellence (which encompasses the Learning Management System group) for the past 18 months.. He was Director of IT Support Services for Appalachian State University for the past 10 years and IT Manager for... Read More →
avatar for Dustin Gragg

Dustin Gragg

Desktop Support Manager, Appalachian State University
Dustin Gragg is the Desktop Support Manager at Appalachian State.His professional interests include IT service management, process improvement, customer education and engagement, and personnel management.His personal interests include cooking, board games, and being outdoors.


Friday February 16, 2018 3:50pm - 4:15pm PST
E-Poster Session 3 Plemmons Student Union

3:50pm PST

#3 - If your lesson was a story, how would you tell it? Video production strategies for online teaching
Technology: I will share strategies for using video technology to enhance students’ engagement, interest, and sense of community in online learning contexts. With more courses moving to online, hybrid, and other blended situations, instructors are increasingly reliant on pre-made video content. Although there are ample video resources available online— and many faculty create their own using Camtasia, Panopto, Screencast-O-matic and other tools— a possible negative outcome of dependence on pre-made content or screencasts is a loss of authenticity in teaching. My session focuses on how instructor-created video with a narrative or story approach may reposition students at the center of instruction.
Evidence:
I began shifting my production strategies in online video creation after being bored by my own screencasts. Using a video production approach that presented each lesson or unit as a story offered students a more authentic entry into learning. Through the use of videos that leverage simple editing techniques, present student work, and include instructor voice, I have seen growth in my online communities of learning. Students often respond in course reviews that the videos enhanced their experience of the course, of community, and of their relationship to the instructor.

Broader Impacts: While abundant resources exist to facilitate instructors and students in online learning contexts, many of these technology tools are ultimately situated for profit. The danger of an over-reliance on pre-made video content or screencast tools is that we may lose ownership of our courses, authenticity in our learning communities, and the value of thoughtfully cultivated teaching and learning relationships. The broader impacts of teacher-created video stories for online learning is that we preserve the integrity of human relationships and experience in learning. If we do not create our own content, for-profit companies (e.g. Pearson) may gladly step into the void.

Speakers
avatar for Theresa Redmond

Theresa Redmond

Associate Professor, Appalachian State University
Theresa is an Associate Professor at Appalachian State University where she teaches in Media Studies and Teacher Education. Her research investigates how digital media and communication technologies impact literacy, fluency, teaching, learning, expression, and engagement. Currently... Read More →


Friday February 16, 2018 3:50pm - 4:15pm PST
E-Poster Session 3 Plemmons Student Union

3:50pm PST

#4 - Screencast-O-Matic – Video Made Easy
Technology: Increasingly, teachers want to create videos to share content, narrate PowerPoints, demo software, or create a weekly screencast about upcoming classroom activities. Screencast-O-Matic offers an easy, free way to record your screen or webcam and post the video without downloading a software program or investing hours to learn a new product. Once the recording is complete, users can save it to their computer or upload to YouTube.
Evidence: As an IT Consultant, Mary Beth works with a range of faculty across different disciplines. When Susan was teaching an online course for the first time several years ago, Mary Beth showed her Screencast-O-Matic as a tool for creating video. She liked it so much, she shared it with her colleagues, who also appreciated the quality and ease-of-use. In course evaluations, Susan's students state that the videos are extremely helpful in understanding course material and make the online experience feel more personal. Rather than detailed written explanations, Susan finds that Screencast-O-Matic is an easy and efficient way to reach students. 
Broader Impacts: While there are variety of resources for incorporating video in a classroom, when faculty create their own screencasts, they can cater the content to their students’ specific needs. Self-made videos can also personalize content in an online environment.

Speakers
MB

Mary Beth McKee

Lead Instructional Designer, Appalachian State University
SP

Susan Poorman

Senior Lecturer, Appalachian State University
I use Screencast-O-Matic with my online classes. Students find the videos very helpful and I find the program very user-friendly.


Friday February 16, 2018 3:50pm - 4:15pm PST
E-Poster Session 3 Plemmons Student Union

3:50pm PST

#5 - Teaching Digital History in an Alternative Learning Classroom (ALC)
Technology: The use of technology is built into this course (Teaching History with New Media) via DST, digital archive, and other projects.
Evidence: Student feedback, anecdotal evidence, and some raw data provided indications of how an ALC (and technology) helped students understand history pedagogy in the digital age.
Broader Impacts: This presentation assesses the extent to which an ALC enhanced (or made little difference to) students' comfort in teaching and learning about history with new technologies.

Speakers
avatar for Rwany Sibaja

Rwany Sibaja

Assistant Professor, Appalachian State University
Director of History/Social Studies Education in the Dept. of History. My primary research interests center on sports and national identity in Latin America (Argentina, Costa Rica), but I also analyze how digital tools are transforming the teaching and learning of the past. Previously... Read More →
MW

Macy Watts

Student, Appalachian State University
AW

Abby Williams

Graduate Student, Appalachian State University



Friday February 16, 2018 3:50pm - 4:15pm PST
E-Poster Session 3 Plemmons Student Union

3:50pm PST

#6 - Using Voicethread to Support and Enhance Student Presentations of Learning
Technology: I will share how my students use Voicethread for presentations of learning with relation to effective instruction for English Learners. For the assignment, students research an instructional strategy, prepare a Voicethread to explain the strategy, and then model the strategy in a hands-on manner during our class meeting. The use of Voicethread for this assignment enhances student learning because the format requires students to synthesize information, and encourages preservice teachers to integrate visual, audio and text to communicate ideas more effectively. This reinforces principles of Universal Design for Learning and allows us to focus on hands-on applications in class.
Evidence: In mid-term evaluations, the majority of students stated that they enjoyed completing the voicethread project and noted a few different reasons. For one, many are unfamiliar with the tool, which is versatile and applicable to elementary classroom settings and projects. Students state that they appreciate being able to view one another’s’ projects and learn from one another. The format allows the learner to go back and re-view the material and, if preferred, read along with the script. Additionally, because students must prepare the voicethread in advance of the in-class modeling of the strategy, I have observed that the overall quality of these in-class presentations has improved.
Broader Impacts: By introducing students to different ways to apply technology to supporting and enhancing their own learning, perhaps they will be more open to integrating technology and multi-modal projects into their own teaching in the future.

Speakers
SF

Shanan Fitts

Associate Professor, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 3:50pm - 4:15pm PST
E-Poster Session 3 Plemmons Student Union

3:50pm PST

#7 - Belk Library’s new video recording room
Technology: Students and faculty can make recordings for assignments, demonstrations, presentations, green screening, and interviews.
Evidence: Student and faculty constantly ask for a space to quickly record video for classes. We now offer this service.
Broader Impacts: Winterize your course, fast video recording, one button type solutions for video creation.

Speakers
WC

Wilford Cummings

Classroom Technology Support, Appalachian State University
Digital Media Specialist


Friday February 16, 2018 3:50pm - 4:25pm PST
E-Poster Session 3 Plemmons Student Union

3:50pm PST

#8 - Using a 360 Camera to Present Content
Technology: 360 degree cameras can be used to take video footage and still images from a variety of environments and then make those environments accessible to students by use of various free websites. Low cost virtual reality devices such as Google Cardboard can provide a sense of immersion in an external environment. Examples of this might be sharing footage of an emergency room, or a city, or geographical formation.
Evidence: The technology of 360 degree cameras is still relatively new and to my knowledge has not had much impact on classroom practice. The library has purchased several 360 degree cameras and would like to work with faculty interested in the technology and evaluate its impact on student learning.
Broader Impacts: The value of immersive environments is still being evaluated in academia, but the possibilities of being able to introduce students to environments where the classroom is typically unable to reach seem great.

Link to presentation:

Using a 360 Degree Camera to Present Content​​​

Speakers
avatar for Scott Rice

Scott Rice

Coordinator, Technology Services, Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 3:50pm - 4:25pm PST
E-Poster Session 3 Plemmons Student Union

3:50pm PST

#9 - WeVideo - Online video editor
Technology: WeVideo allows students to edit digital projects from the convenience of their personal computers or any computer with access to the web. The online editor makes it easy to learn editing and to share projects among group members.
Evidence: UDFS has purchased 50 WeVideo licenses (although a limited free version is available). We are testing the product this semester. So far the students seem to like the program. They like the intuitive nature of the program and the convenience of working at home. A great tool for classes that have media project assignments.
Broader Impacts: WeVideo is an editing software that is easy to learn and accessible for the campus community. A great alternative to Adobe Premiere Pro that is not readily available to students.

Speakers
BD

Beth Davison

Appalachian State University


Friday February 16, 2018 3:50pm - 4:25pm PST
E-Poster Session 3 Plemmons Student Union

4:15pm PST

Social & Prize Draw
Stick around for prizes and beverages.  It's a great time to start the connecting process!



Friday February 16, 2018 4:15pm - 6:00pm PST
Parkway Ballroom Plemmons Student Union