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Friday, February 16 • 2:35pm - 3:00pm
#6 - The New Moment for Open Educational Resources

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Technology: The idea of open educational resources seemed once a not-so-feasible pipedream for educators. However, a new day has arrived: a number of universities are pioneering new ways to deliver student resources with free or low-cost collections of high quality, well-curated free online textbooks that offer them a chance in the fight against gauging by proprietary textbook publishers. Open educational resources are typically textbooks and other curriculum resources available for free on the web for students in various formats (sometimes cloud-based, sometimes downloadable), saving them hundreds of dollars in a day when a college education can ill be afforded.
Evidence: In a 2016 study, the cost of textbooks meant that 66% of students had not purchased a required course textbook; 45% did not register for a specific course; 37% had earned a poor grade; 26% had dropped a course; and 19% had failed a course. These numbers had all risen significantly from similar indexes for the 2012 school year. In a pilot study at AppState this fall, strong support was found among students for open educational resources. More importantly, students responded well to being given a voice in the textbooks chosen for their courses.
Broader Impacts: As more organized and polished approaches to open educational resources expand, and as instructors are willing to try them, education becomes more sustainable for students, reducing their debt and improving their chances of post-college success serving society, rather than serving overwhelming student loans due in part to overpriced textbooks.
Technology: The idea of open educational resources seemed once a not-so-feasible pipedream for educators. However, a new day has arrived: a number of universities are pioneering new ways to deliver student resources with free or low-cost collections of high quality, well-curated free online textbooks that offer them a chance in the fight against gauging by proprietary textbook publishers. Open educational resources are typically textbooks and other curriculum resources available for free on the web for students in various formats (sometimes cloud-based, sometimes downloadable), saving them hundreds of dollars in a day when a college education can ill be afforded.
Evidence: In a 2016 study, the cost of textbooks meant that 66% of students had not purchased a required course textbook; 45% did not register for a specific course; 37% had earned a poor grade; 26% had dropped a course; and 19% had failed a course. These numbers had all risen significantly from similar indexes for the 2012 school year. In a pilot study at AppState this fall, strong support was found among students for open educational resources. More importantly, students responded well to being given a voice in the textbooks chosen for their courses.
Broader Impacts: As more organized and polished approaches to open educational resources expand, and as instructors are willing to try them, education becomes more sustainable for students, reducing their debt and improving their chances of post-college success serving society, rather than serving overwhelming student loans due in part to overpriced textbooks.

Link to presentation:

The New Moment for Open Educational Resources​​​

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Clark

Rachel Clark

Instructional Technology Consultant, Appalachian State University
Rachel Clark is an Instructional Technology Consultant in the Center for Academic Excellence at Appalachian State University. She trains Appalachian’s faculty and staff in technologies that support learning and teaching and consults in best teaching practices. Prior to her current... Read More →
avatar for Hannah Pope

Hannah Pope

Faculty, Appalachian State University
Hannah Pope is the Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Appalachian State University Libraries where she has created and run the makerspace program since its inception. She received her Masters in Library Science from UNC Chapel Hill.


Friday February 16, 2018 2:35pm - 3:00pm PST
E-Poster Session 2 Plemmons Student Union

Attendees (3)